MEDP 299.XX Hunter College at the City University of New YorkPosts RSS Comments RSS

Agreement To Suspend Hostilities

A ceasefire is a modus vivendi and not a peace treaty whose agreement can take months or even years. The 1953 ceasefire agreement is an important example of a ceasefire that was not followed by a peace treaty. A ceasefire is also different from a ceasefire or ceasefire that involves a temporary cessation of hostilities for an agreed limited time or within a demarcated area. A ceasefire may be needed to negotiate a ceasefire. A ceasefire is a formal agreement of the belligerents to end the fighting. This is not necessarily the end of a war, because it can only represent a cessation of hostilities while trying to negotiate a lasting peace. It is derived from the Latin arma, which means “weapons” (as in weapons) and stitium, which means “a stop.” [1] The cessation of hostilities is broader and more formal than a ceasefire, but not quite a ceasefire agreement. One or both sides say they will suspend the fighting as a whole. The cessations are generally conceived as the beginning of a major peace process, but they are temporary and non-binding, and in a conflict involving many parties, such as the civil war in Syria, the attitude can only apply to a few opponents. A ceasefire is usually a negotiated agreement to end hostilities and take other measures to calm things down, such as withdrawing heavy weapons or marking a “green line” or demilitarized zone to separate opposing forces. Although ceasefires are generally supposed to be binding, last for some time and persist even after a few violations, they do not themselves end a conflict, but merely maintain it. Under international law, a ceasefire is a legal agreement (often in a document) that puts an end to fighting between the “belligerents” of war or conflict. [2] In the Hague Convention of 1899, in which three treaties were concluded and three declarations were made, the Convention on the Laws and Customs of War in Rural Areas established that “if the duration of the ceasefire is not fixed”, the parties can resume fighting (Article 36) at their convenience, but with correct communications.

It is a “fixed-term” ceasefire, where the parties can only renew the fighting at the end of their fixed duration. If the belligerents say (in fact) “this ceasefire puts a complete end to the fighting” without a ceasefire deadline, then the duration of the ceasefire is set in the sense that no resumption of fighting is allowed at any time.

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